Tag Archives: #SusanToy

…GoReadMe!… m’Lady, Susan M. Toy’s fabulous idea for Authors and Readers…

…from daft ideas often come the next ‘great thing… the following Guest Post from my dear friend and fellow scribbler, Susan Toy, may interest other Writers and Readers… feedback on it is encouraged… please let us know if this is sum’thing yeez could support:

GoReadMe! – an idea on Crowd Reading

susan

Susan M. Toy.

The marvelous Seumas Gallacher posted a status update to Facebook, a joke really, that had me laughing out loud here in my little trailer …

“…thinking of doing a GoFundMe thingy for a movie about my ‘To Be Read’ pile on my ebook Reader… calling it ‘Kindler’s List’… all contributions welcome… J”

Then an idea struck me – “What if,” I thought (those great little words that lead to the beginning of many great ideas, stories and novels). And I wrote a message to the kind sir himself, running past him first the kernel of this tiny idea that was forming, just to see if he thought it to be a good one himself. He did, and then I offered to write a guest blog post for him, after I’d given the whole thing – as to full concept and execution – more thought.

So here it is … the GoReadMe Campaign!

First, let’s go back a little way in time to a blog post I published in March of this year on the perennial subject that’s of interest to all authors – Looking for Readers in All the Right Places. https://islandeditions.wordpress.com/2016/03/03/looking-for-readers-in-all-the-right-places-2/ (I had actually blogged about this dilemma a couple of times previous and those links are included in this post. If you are an author looking for readers then I suggest you read about all my previous ideas.)

We’re all familiar with the GoFundMe campaigns Mr. Gallacher mentioned in his joke. They come in many different guises and are meant to help creators and business people raise the necessary funds required to launch and cover the expenses of producing a project by involving their friends directly in that financing.

So, when Seumas combined the idea of crowdfunding with the concept of a film about enormous to-be-read piles of books (which, to be honest, every single reader worth their salt has in their homes as well as on their eReaders, etc.), I laughed out loud, as I mentioned above, but then I began to think. So I sent him a private message:

“Seumas, your GoFundMe campaign to finance a film, Kindler’s List, had me laughing! But then, I thought … What about setting up a campaign called GoReadMe, and instead of raising money we raise awareness for reading and reading our books in particular? What do you think? I would love to take a crack at developing this idea into a thing and writing a guest blog post about the “campaign” for your blog that we can all then promote on our own blogs. Do you have any thoughts as to how we could present this campaign? Would we have a goal to find, say, 50 readers who will commit to buy and read a certain book or books by a certain author? Would love to hear your thoughts on this. It could be fun!”

And Seumas’s reply was simply, “terrific idea , m’Lady ”

Okay, so I used the words “What about” and not “What if” – same thing, essentially.

The point is that I’ve given more thought to this idea since first presenting it to SG and here are my new thoughts as to how it might work …

We choose an author who is interested in finding new readers for their books. Let’s begin with Seumas, since this is his blog, after all, and he was the one who started my brain rolling in this particular direction.

We make the announcement that we are beginning a GoReadMe! Campaign (and I’ve just added the exclamation point there to the name, because I think it looks better …) for this author and we’re looking for 50 new readers who will “pledge” to read either one of the author’s books or a specific title. Not only will they pledge to read the book themselves, but they’ll also agree to recommend that book to another reader who will join in on the GoReadMe! Campaign. That way, we only need to find 25 unique readers, because those new readers will find the other 25 for us. The campaign lasts a month, let’s say, during which time the author, and the author’s friends, promote the campaign, and the author keeps a public tally on their blog of the number of people who have pledged, and their names (or those who wish to remain “anonymous”), who have committed to reading a book and finding other new readers for it. Simple!

And, if friends have already read the author’s book(s) but still wish to become involved in the GoReadMe! Campaign, they can help by promoting this idea to their friends, encouraging others to become involved in reading this author’s great books!

In the end, what the “Readers” receive by pledging in this way is a warm/fuzzy feeling of not only discovering and reading a new book by a great author, but also the knowledge that they are helping to promote reading in general by becoming involved in this campaign in particular and encouraging more people to read.

By the way, I believe that the personal recommendation of a book by a friend is a much more effective way (word-of-mouth) of promoting a book than any review on Amazon or Goodreads, so that’s why I’m not suggesting that “write a review” be a requisite for readers pledging to take part in this campaign. No pressure, folks! Just pledge to read the book and find at least one other new reader. What can be simpler than that?

So, let’s begin the experiment, shall we?

Announcing … the GoReadMe! Campaign for Seumas Gallacher!

We need 50 people to pledge to read at least one of Seumas’s Jack Calder novels (listed below) and to recommend to one other reader that they do the same. You have 30 Days during which to pledge. This Campaign ends on Sept. 22. Please sign up in the comments section of this blog post. Thanks for taking part in this initial GoReadMe! Campaign!

Links to Seumas’s books:

THE VIOLIN MANS LEGACY

myBook.to/theviolinmanslegacy

VENGEANCE WEARS BLACK

myBook.to/vengeancewearsblack

SAVAGE PAYBACK

myBook.to/savagepayback

KILLER CITY

myBook.to/calderkillercity

wallpaper 2…see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!

ALL MY BLOG POSTS ARE FREE TO SHARE OR RE-BLOG SHOULD YOU SO WISH—BE MY GUEST!

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Seumas Gallacher – a few thoughts on returning to self-publishing

…many thanks to Susan Toy for featuring my blethers once more …

Reading Recommendations

Seumas Gallacher has been a long-time pal of Reading Recommendations and has done a great deal to promote (and become friends with!) many of the other authors I promote, as well as with me, and of my writing! He has been featured in the group, Reading Recommendations Revisited, and has returned to tell us of his recent publishing experience and why he switched back to self-publishing, a story that is best told in the Kind Sir’s very own inimitable style.

12662512_670070376467678_141398210796444441_n

The Jack Calder Series
by Seumas Gallacher

… having recently returned to the ranks of the self-published author brigade, I’m delighted to report that the joy of being able once more to track my Amazon Kindle activity on a daily basis makes me a much happier scribbling bunny

… I traipsed into the realm of the ‘housed writers’ for a year, and although the good people at Crooked Cat…

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…Susan Toy outlines 10 Ways To Kill Your Writing… PART FIVE…

…I’m delighted to run a five-days consecutive series of posts from my terrific pal, Author, Susan Toy, for every author to enjoy and prob’ly learn lots from… here’s PART FIVE :

10 Ways to Kill Your Writing

This 5-part article is from a talk I gave at the Calgary Public Library Writers’ Weekend Feb. 4, 2012.

Thanks to all of you for reading this series that is very kindly being hosted by the ONE, the ONLY, SEUMAS GALLACHER!

 Part 5 

  1. Stop reading

 And this is related to Way #3 – Copy others and don’t search for and develop your own voice.

Do not stop reading for fear you’ll copy others.

Continue reading and read widely and deeply, and well outside your genre or style, so that you may learn how to write well. Read bad writing as well as the award-winning books, so you may learn to tell the difference between the two.

We didn’t begin writing without first learning to read. Reading is the foundation for writing.

And think about what reading a particular book means to you as a reader rather than as a writer. Reading books is the greatest writing instruction you will ever receive.

Don’t just take my word for it … Read Francine Prose’s excellent book, Reading Like a Writer: A Guide for People Who Love Books and for Those Who Want to Write Them. Prose will teach you how to get the most out of your reading so it helps improve your writing.

  1. Stop writing

You might think this would have been self-evident or that perhaps it should have been #1 on my list.

You’d be amazed by the number of writers, and successful authors, who have gone through dry periods or never can write again. Some call it writer’s block, but this drought is usually due to a lack of self-esteem. You think your work sucks; you’ve received just one too-many rejection; you lack any good ideas. You lose passion for your craft. You despair that you may never write again.

This too has happened to me. It became easier to find excuses not to write than to just get back at it again.

Sometimes it’s better to take a step back and leave your writing to lie dormant for a while. But if you listened to what I said earlier about becoming part of a writing community, networking, working with a mentor, writer-in-residence or an editor, it is possible to fire up your passion once again.

Whatever you do, don’t quit because you’ve self-diagnosed that your writing sucks. Get a second and maybe a third opinion. Find out from the experts how you may improve.

But whatever you do… DON’T STOP WRITING !!!

  1. Fail to admit that you are the only gatekeeper stopping your work from being completed and / or published

There’s a lot of talk in this business about the mythical and mysterious Gatekeeper who is stopping your work from being published.

Repeat after me – I am the only Gatekeeper.

The truth is that publishers, editors and agents are constantly on the lookout for the next best book by a talented author that will wow everyone – because that’s how they make their money. Mediocre books do not sell a lot of copies. Books similar to others already published do not sell a lot of copies. And, for the most part, bad writing does not sell a lot of copies.

I attended a workshop and learned about pitching books to movie producers. Surprisingly, the process is much the same as it is for pitching a book to book agents or publishers. Every producer there agreed that what they want most is to make a great movie. Not just a good movie, but a GREAT movie!

I know for a fact that’s also on the minds of publishers, agents and editors – they’re sifting through the slush pile looking for a great book to publish. I bet that if you were to ask each publisher or editor what they’re looking for, they’ll say, “A Great Book!”

So it’s really up to you. You can stop being the gatekeeper by writing a book and a query letter that aren’t just good enough, but the very best you can make them. Never settle for less. Besides, you owe it to your readers to give them a great book.

Remember, if you DON’T follow these 13 ways, YOU WILL SUCCEED!!!  

Every writer – EVERY ONE – has faced the same problems, the same struggles – YOU DON’T SUCK!!

You just need to constantly remind yourself that at some time in their careers all writers were beginners, just like you …

But even seasoned and successful writers out there can use a reminder about …

The 10 Ways to Kill Your Writing… including 3 Bonus ways!!  

Let’s revisit our new author again to hear what he’s learned…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=br4nd-00wrc

And, if you require further encouragement, here’s advice from another expert …

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8Et28kBi1A

Thank you!

Susan Toy has been a bookseller, an award-winning publishing sales representative, a literacy teacher, and is now a published author, publisher, and promoter of fellow authors and their books. Born and raised in Toronto, and after completing a degree in English Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, she moved to Calgary in the late 70s and immediately found a job in a bookstore, beginning what has become a life’s career working with books and their authors.

Link for Island in the Clouds: https://islandeditions.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/where-in-the-world-can-you-purchase-island-in-the-clouds/

Link for That Last Summer:

https://islandeditions.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/where-to-purchase-islandshorts-ebooks3.pdf

 …yeez can catch some of m’Lady, Susan’s WURK and links here :

Blog: http://islandeditions.wordpress.com/
And a blog dedicated to promoting other authors and their books
Reading Recommendations 
cover-susan-full-colour-jan2012is_thatlastsummer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!… 

ALL MY BLOG POSTS ARE FREE TO SHARE OR RE-BLOG SHOULD YOU SO WISH—BE MY GUEST!

 

 

 

 

 

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…Susan Toy outlines 10 Ways To Kill Your Writing… PART FOUR…

hpim3640

…I’m delighted to run a five-days consecutive series of posts from my terrific pal, Author, Susan Toy, for every author to enjoy and prob’ly learn lots from… here’s PART FOUR :

10 Ways to Kill Your Writing

This 5-part article is from a talk I gave at the Calgary Public Library Writers’ Weekend Feb. 4, 2012.

Thanks to all of you for reading this series that is very kindly being hosted by the ONE, the ONLY, SEUMAS GALLACHER!

 Part 4

  1. Don’t / do follow the rules

Rules are made to be obeyed and rules are meant to be broken. But you can’t obey or break them unless you first read and understand them. This holds true not only for writing, but also for submitting your manuscript and for publishing it.

Once you know and understand the rules of the business, you may work with them and redefine, to a certain extent.

But whatever you do – don’t think that you or your work are the exceptions to those rules. If you do that, you’ll find you will only hurt yourself.

  1. a) Listen to and believe advice and criticism from family and friends

I know your mother loves you, but that doesn’t make her the best critic of your writing. Neither are your Grade 6 teacher nor your high school BFF. Yes, it’s great to feel all warm and fuzzy hearing their compliments – I know. I’ve been there.

The one true thing I learned from my years writing and trying to get my work published is that we all need the experts – editors, writing instructors, mentors, good readers – and we should surround ourselves with them.

There’s nothing better than finding a reader with a discerning eye who can see not only what is brilliant about your manuscript, but also how it may be improved.

And editors are worth their weight in gold! A good editor will stand by what they are taught – to not make changes, but to offer suggestions as to how you may improve your work.

The best classes I took were those in editing, and I didn’t learn as much about how to edit my own work as I did about how to work effectively with an editor.

I consult with my own editor on a regular basis, mainly because we have become friends, but also because I know she “gets” me – and she has an eagle eye for mistakes I make! Plus she cheers me on and “encourages” me to get back to work on my next novel. (Okay, Rachel, okay!! I’m trying to write more …) You can’t do anything better for your writing than to find an editor you can work with, someone who can help you make your writing better and your words sing! It may take a while to find that perfect editor, but it’s worth taking the time to search. Begin by checking with professional editing associations for referrals.

Or you can check out this blog post I wrote about my own editor, Rachel Small. It’s in my best interest to keep her working as an editor, so I’m more than happy to share her with you!

I know you’re groaning, “But isn’t a professional editor expensive?” No, not in the scheme of things, and if you want a professional job done you call in the professionals. remember it was Sybil Fawlty who scolded her husband Basil when he hired a  cut-rate contractor in Fawlty Towers: “You get what you pay for!” This is true of editors, as well. Fortunately, a professional editor and fellow-blogger, roughsesinthemed, wrote a comprehensive post about what you can expect to pay for various types of editing:

What price your editor? (Or decorator, or plumber, or dentist, or cleaner)

And, just in case you’re wondering what editors actually do all day . . . watch this video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3Gwhp3MuXXE

Remember, if you want a hug and a there-there about your writing, go visit your mother. If you want solid advice and help, seek out the experts and the professionals.

b) Argue with readers that they must not “get” what you’ve written

No, no, no, no and no!

Don’t ever argue with a reader. Don’t ever explain the point you’re trying to make that you think they’ve missed. If they’re missing something then it’s not their fault – it’s yours for not writing clearly enough. Listen to what your reader finds to be a problem and fix it.

A friend told me a story about what happened to him when he contacted someone who wrote a not-so-positive review … A reader posted a review in which she complained about the editing in my book. I messaged her back, thanked her for the review, and said how much I appreciated her criticism. She asked if I was being sarcastic, and I said absolutely not, that I really appreciated what she said because it made me go back and take a good look at the book and realize she was justified in her review. She said she would buy my next books because of my response. She liked the story, but the editing was a little rough. So I was able to keep a fan I wouldn’t have otherwise because I accepted what she had said and acted upon the advice.

And whatever you do, don’t argue with readers online and in public. If they’ve taken the time to read your writing, be gracious, thank them for reading and commenting, but don’t argue with them if you disagree. And realize, too, that some people just like to see their own comments in print and there’s no arguing with them anyway.

And when your book is published and receives a bad review you don’t feel is warranted – do not comment! Just accept the fact that this particular critic did not like your book and hope another reviewer will.

  1. a) Bug everyone about your writing or your published book

This Way refers back to #1 about being too serious or obsessive about your work.

How many authors have you stopped following on Twitter or hidden on Facebook because you were tired of hearing them toot their own horn? You want to say, “If your book is so good then why am I not hearing about it from your readers?”

Remember, you’re not the first person to have written or published a book. And you won’t be the last. If you had done as I mentioned earlier, and become part of a larger writing community, you wouldn’t have any problem finding someone else to toot your horn for you.

So don’t overexpose yourself, especially if your book can’t live up to your hype.

  1. b) Promote too much / promote too little

On the other hand, there is also a problem with not promoting yourself and your work enough. I get it! Some authors are not comfortable promoting themselves so they should definitely consider calling in the professionals to help them.

So 10B comes into play here – find your happy medium, where you can promote at a Goldilocks’ level – not too much, not too little, but just right.

Because the absolute last two things you want to do is either piss off your audience or never reach them at all.

Be sure to come back for Part 5 and the Three Bonus Ways to Kill Your Writing!!!

Susan Toy has been a bookseller, an award-winning publishing sales representative, a literacy teacher, and is now a published author, publisher, and promoter of fellow authors and their books. Born and raised in Toronto, and after completing a degree in English Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, she moved to Calgary in the late 70s and immediately found a job in a bookstore, beginning what has become a life’s career working with books and their authors.

Link for Island in the Clouds: https://islandeditions.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/where-in-the-world-can-you-purchase-island-in-the-clouds/

Link for That Last Summer:

https://islandeditions.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/where-to-purchase-islandshorts-ebooks3.pdf

 …yeez can catch some of m’Lady, Susan’s WURK and links here :

Blog: http://islandeditions.wordpress.com/
And a blog dedicated to promoting other authors and their books
Reading Recommendations 
cover-susan-full-colour-jan2012is_thatlastsummer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!… 

ALL MY BLOG POSTS ARE FREE TO SHARE OR RE-BLOG SHOULD YOU SO WISH—BE MY GUEST!

 

 

 

 

 

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…Susan Toy outlines 10 Ways To Kill Your Writing… PART THREE…

…I’m delighted to run a five-days consecutive series of posts from my terrific pal, Author, Susan Toy, for every author to enjoy and prob’ly learn lots from… here’s PART THREE :

10 Ways to Kill Your Writing

This 5-part article is from a talk I gave at the Calgary Public Library Writers’ Weekend Feb. 4, 2012.

Thanks to all of you for reading this series that is very kindly being hosted by the ONE, the ONLY, SEUMAS GALLACHER!

Part 3

  1. Learn nothing about the publishing business

There was a time when writers sent their work off to publishers, signed a contract, worked with an editor, then sat back and let the publisher take over. They had no clue as to what happened next in the process of printing, publishing and selling their books. And, to be fair, many publishers liked that things stayed that way.

I believe authors do themselves a great favour by learning something about the publishing business because by doing so they then can become a more effective partner in the publication of their book.

Publishing Trendsetter’s Life Cycle of a Book  

http://publishingtrendsetter.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Book-Cycle-FINAL.pdf

Publishing Trendsetter is a website I stumbled upon that is devoted to educating the industry. Elisabeth Watson, the president, and her staff developed the above flow chart called The Life Cycle of a Book, and a series of videos covering all the steps a book takes from concept to reader. I love flow charts! And this one is particularly good. Do spend some time going over it carefully. How many steps are covered that you didn’t realize were part of the process?

Writer – has an idea for a book, writes it, edits it into a manuscript, sends to agent.

Here’s Adam Gidwitz, first-time author, speaking of his initial experience as a new writer…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=vJ77QvwRowA

After you’ve finished reading the rest of today’s post, go back to the site and watch the other videos. Educate yourself!

  1. Stop trying to improve your work

I attended a talk given by Aritha van Herk during which a person in the audience asked, “When do you know that something you’re writing is finished?” And Aritha’s answer was, “You never finish. You can always improve.”

Writing is a process and we can constantly learn, and improve, and discover ways to make our books better.

So don’t think you’re finished because you’ve written “The End.” That should be your cue to go back to the beginning and figure out how to make your manuscript even better. After all, you owe it to your readers to make whatever you write the very best it can be!

Susan Toy has been a bookseller, an award-winning publishing sales representative, a literacy teacher, and is now a published author, publisher, and promoter of fellow authors and their books. Born and raised in Toronto, and after completing a degree in English Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, she moved to Calgary in the late 70s and immediately found a job in a bookstore, beginning what has become a life’s career working with books and their authors.

Link for Island in the Clouds: https://islandeditions.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/where-in-the-world-can-you-purchase-island-in-the-clouds/

Link for That Last Summer:

https://islandeditions.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/where-to-purchase-islandshorts-ebooks3.pdf

…yeez can catch some of m’Lady, Susan’s WURK and links here :

Blog: http://islandeditions.wordpress.com/
And a blog dedicated to promoting other authors and their books
Reading Recommendations 
cover-susan-full-colour-jan2012is_thatlastsummer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!… 

ALL MY BLOG POSTS ARE FREE TO SHARE OR RE-BLOG SHOULD YOU SO WISH—BE MY GUEST!

 

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…Susan Toy outlines 10 Ways to Kill Your Writing…Part Two…

hpim3640

…I’m delighted to run a five-days consecutive series of posts from my terrific pal, Author, Susan Toy, for every author to enjoy and prob’ly learn lots from… here’s PART TWO :

10 Ways to Kill Your Writing

This 5-part article is from a talk I gave at the Calgary Public Library Writers’ Weekend Feb. 4, 2012.

Thanks to all of you for reading this series that is very kindly being hosted by the ONE, the ONLY, SEUMAS GALLACHER!

Part 2

  1. Copy others and don’t search for and develop your own voice

When I first began writing creatively, I had already enjoyed a long career in bookselling and as a sales rep for publishers. During that time, I got to meet everyone – and I mean everyone!

Gail Bowen was one author I worked with who became a friend and I wanted to be just like her – writing mysteries set in a specific locale.

Then I began taking writing classes and I’m embarrassed and ashamed to admit to you now that I actually said to Paul Quarrington, my mentor, that I had not read any of his books before beginning the course because I didn’t want his writing to influence the “voice” I was trying to develop.

I know! What an idiot!

Writers should always find an author whose writing they can aspire to emulate. Not mimic or imitate, but a standard of accomplishment and success to aim for.

I realize now how arrogant and insulting I must have sounded to Paul at that time. The only consolation I have is that I hear the same words from other beginning writers – that they need to develop a unique voice and cannot risk being influenced by such-and-such a great writer.

You should be so lucky to learn to write that well!

By the way, that unique voice I was so concerned about developing? It eventually came to me, and without my actually realizing it, because the more I wrote the more ME I put on the page. It was unconscious at the time, but I have been told by readers that they enjoy the voice I’ve created in my stories, so I’m pretty chuffed about that.

I never would have reached that point though if I hadn’t just kept writing, reading, revising, and learning my craft.

  1. Believe you are the first to have . . .
  2. a) written a particular story

There are very few new ideas in this business, but there are fresh approaches to those ideas. Shakespeare gave us the twelve great stories, the original themes, and everything else tends to be a variation of one of those themes. The key here is to be able to tell each story with a twist – from your own personal perspective.

b) made mistakes in your writing

I could include here, “Believe that you are the first to say stupid things,” as I mentioned I did with Paul Quarrington.

I bet if I could ask here for a raise of hands we’d see a lot of them in answer to a question whether anyone has ever made a mistake in their writing, especially early on in their careers.

It happens – get over it! But do make sure you learn from those mistakes.

  1. c) struggled to write

Again, asking for a raise of hands would probably garner a response from everyone reading this blog post.

  1. d) heard from readers that perhaps you should consider finding a day job . . . Or a new hobby.

Writing isn’t for everyone and definitely it’s not for the faint of heart. If you can’t take criticism then step away from the computer. If you can withstand the slings and arrows, then learn from them. Learn how to work with an editor. Find a writing instructor who can help you.

If you truly have a passion to write, and a story to tell, you will overcome those early critiques and learn to write so that readers believe this IS your day job!

And don’t kvetch about mistakes, difficulties, embarrassments, criticism, rejection, etc. We’ve all been there. We all know what you’re going through. So just pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and get back to writing!

  1. Think that “everyone” will want to read what you write

If you tell me this then I know you don’t have a clue who you are writing for. You must know your market. While every one of us hopes our books will sell a million copies and that Oprah or Mark Zuckerberg will invite us to be featured in their book clubs, the reality is your book will likely appeal to a rather small segment of the population. Know who this is you’re writing for, who your writing will appeal to, or at least have a good idea of your audience. This will really help your writing develop when you focus on a particular group.

Or take that even further … Aritha van Herk told us in a workshop that she always thinks of Alberto Manguel as being her perfect reader, and that she writes specifically with him in mind. Who would be your perfect reader, the one author you would write for and whose approval you seek?

Susan Toy has been a bookseller, an award-winning publishing sales representative, a literacy teacher, and is now a published author, publisher, and promoter of fellow authors and their books. Born and raised in Toronto, and after completing a degree in English Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, she moved to Calgary in the late 70s and immediately found a job in a bookstore, beginning what has become a life’s career working with books and their authors.

Link for Island in the Clouds: https://islandeditions.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/where-in-the-world-can-you-purchase-island-in-the-clouds/

Link for That Last Summer:

https://islandeditions.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/where-to-purchase-islandshorts-ebooks3.pdf

…yeez can catch some of m’Lady, Susan’s WURK and links here :

Blog: http://islandeditions.wordpress.com/
And a blog dedicated to promoting other authors and their books
Reading Recommendations 
cover-susan-full-colour-jan2012is_thatlastsummer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!… 

ALL MY BLOG POSTS ARE FREE TO SHARE OR RE-BLOG SHOULD YOU SO WISH—BE MY GUEST!

 

 

 

 

31 Comments

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