…Authors and Readers… let there be no unseemly haste… slow down…

writer

…I s’pose a panel (or psyanel?) of psychiatrists would posit (or psyosit?) that the human need to continue to be satisfied is more than balanced by the need to get stuff ‘finished’… fr’example, as a Reader, the great pleasure of wandering through an engrossing novel can leave yeez not wanting it to end… but, but, but… yeez really want to find out how the denouement plays out… the sadness of closing the book after the last chapter may be sated by grabbing a sequel, if one exists, or starting another tome… the number of times yeez hear ‘I didn’t want it to end’ are quite frequent (and what utter joy that is to an Author’s ears)… on the flip side, as an Author, the desire to reach those wunnerful WURDS, ‘the end’ is a much more parlous condition… too much urgency to complete yer masterpiece will lead to distorted pace in yer narrative… the ‘hasty blurt’ of disgorging information to tie up all yer plot flow ends can be messy, and disturbing to yer Readers

race

…time to put yer metaphorical foot on the ball… take a wee breather… stroll to the finishing line… let there be no unseemly haste… slow down… no need for a hurried sprint to that blissful post-coital-ish after-write… happily, that ungainly Author urge to get it finished, occurred to me when I proof-read my first offering, THE VIOLIN MAN’S LEGACY, before I let it tip-toe onto the Great God Amazon Kindle six years ago… I knew immediately then that the latter part of the book had to be re-written before it was ready to go ‘live’… and I’m grateful that I did… and behold and lo, I discovered that even from the quill-scrapers’ perspective, continued pleasure was derived from taking the time to get the pace right… add to that my determination nowadays not to allow myself to be dictated by deadlines for my scribbling… the literature from Dickens, Chaucer, Shakespeare et al has lasted centuries… I’m sure an extra month or two back then to make sure their final proofs were as they should be, have not been wasted… see yeez later… LUV YEEZ!

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18 Comments

Filed under Blether, Scribbling & Stuff

18 responses to “…Authors and Readers… let there be no unseemly haste… slow down…

  1. Thanks for the reminder – you are so right. Those who publish independently have to pretend they have an editor by their side, making them get the book “JUST RIGHT” before sending it out to the reading public.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Great post, Seumas. My stories tend to drag on and on in the middle. During revisions, I’m usually cutting thousands of words from the middle of the story, and then adding to the end. Pacing is very important.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog and commented:
    Sound advice from Seumas 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Excellent advice that applies to more than just writing books. Slow down, peace, balance and enjoy. Thanks for the reminder. I needed it today.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. So true. Must dot and cross all words that need them.
    The hurrier I go, the behinder I get. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Not properly proof-reading and revising a novel or story can lead to an “act in hast to repent in leisure” type of self-punishment. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Top words. And so true. I’ve found that the compulsion to clatter through to the finish to find out what happens to your characters at the end is hard to fight but it’s well worth the hassle when I do. It is not a race and quality can’t be rushed.

    Cheers

    MTM

    Liked by 1 person

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